Ending Cigarette Use by Adults in a Generation is Possible

It's time to take action...

Clarion Call to Action

…we call for action now to reignite the nation’s tobacco control efforts

Download the report: ENDING CIGARETTE USE BY ADULTS IN A GENERATION IS POSSIBLE

Download the report: ENDING CIGARETTE USE BY ADULTS IN A GENERATION IS POSSIBLE

Unlike 50 years ago, we now know the things we need to do to prevent addiction to tobacco, and to help adults quit smoking. Thus, most of the tobacco-induced illnesses and deaths could be avoided, if we as a nation chose to make that happen.

Because tobacco-induced illnesses and deaths almost always strike people in the prime of life, their negative economic impact on the nation is huge, due to lost productivity and extraordinary health care costs.

If the United States is to be competitive in the global marketplace in the future, and eventually become the healthiest nation, then tobacco control must become the top public health priority for the nation.

Toward that end, we call for action now to reignite the nation’s tobacco control efforts, and we urge the public sector to work with the private sector and the social sector in eliminating tobacco use in America at the earliest possible time.

National Tobacco Reform Mission Statement

MISSION STATEMENT  (download)

The mission of the National Tobacco Reform Initiative (NTRI) team is to facilitate open and evidence-based discussions about the most effective ways to reduce the number of current adult smokers in the U.S. by at least 15 million by the year 2024, an interagency-approved goal.

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FOCUS AND KEY FUNCTIONS

In carrying out its mission, the team will support the three (3) priority actions ranked the highest in a study of 120 tobacco control leaders recently carried out by the National Tobacco Reform Initiative:

  1. Increase excise taxes at the federal level and in many states with four (4) goals: lower adult smoking rates, harmonize taxes across state borders to reduce illicit trade, cover the costs of smoking-related disease, and encourage a shift from cigarettes to reduced-risk products and complete cessation;
  2. Encourage health and life insurers, employers and health professionals to actively promote smoking cessation measures supported by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the 2014 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report;
  3. Establish a more rational tobacco, nicotine and alternative products regulatory framework based on their relative risks, and that is adaptable to the increased speed of innovation in new technology development.

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These three (3) priority actions, which share a common objective of reducing the harm caused by combustible cigarettes, are intended to complement other tobacco control activities which are already being actively pursued.

The NTRI team will look for opportunities to individually and collectively engage in and facilitate dialogue with others, including but not limited to, public health organizations, health care professionals, the research community, governmental agencies and policy makers at the federal, state and local levels, consumers, the media, and tobacco and nicotine product trade associations and manufacturers (where appropriate).

The NTRI team will also identify, call attention to and help to resolve major barriers, program and outreach deficiencies, inhibiting progress toward the 2024 goal.

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Special Notice – Should you have questions or concerns about the above background information, want a copy of the Executive Summary Report on the recent study’s findings and recommendations, or wish to join the NTRI team in its important work, please contact us.

 

 

Actions to Accelerate the Decline in Adult Smoking

Three actions that need to be underpinned by lay and professional media advocacy for adult tobacco cessation.

Three Priority Actions to Accelerate Decline in Adult Smoking

Action 1:

Increase excise taxes at the federal level and in many states with four (4) goals: lower smoking rates, harmonize taxes across state borders to reduce illicit trade, cover the costs of smoking-related disease, and encourage a shift from cigarettes to reduced-risk products and complete cessation.

Action 2:

Encourage health and life insurers, employers, and health professionals to actively promote smoking cessation measures supported by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the 2014 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report.

Action 3:

Establish a more rational tobacco, nicotine, and alternative products regulatory framework based on their relative risks, and that is adaptable to the increased speed of innovation in new technology development.

– Why take action now –

Interviews with three women whose loved ones died from tobacco related illness

From 1964 to 2012, 20 million Americans died from diseases caused by cigarette smoking.

Big tobacco has killed more Americans in a three year period than all deaths caused by America’s enemies, foreign and domestic, from the birth of the country to today.

— Core Team for Tobacco Control —

Michael Terry

Corporate CEO; Son of Former U.S. Surgeon U.S. Surgeon General, Luther Terry, M.D.

Scott Ballin

Health Policy Consultant to the Morven Dialogue, University of Virginia

John Seffrin, Ph.D.,

Professor of Practice, School of Public Health, Indiana University at Bloomington

Donald Shopland

Former Director, Office on Smoking and Health, US Public Health Service

Tom Glynn

Professor, Stanford University

K. Michael Cummings, PhD, MPH

Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina; Co-leader, Tobacco Research Program, Hollings Cancer Center

Tom Miller

Attorney General, State of Iowa

Derek Yach

Chief Health Officer, the Vitalty Group

Dedicated to the Memory of
Charles Aubrey (Mickey) LeMaistre, M.D.
A Tobacco Control Pioneer –

Public health and smoking control lost one of its most ardent supporters on Saturday, January 18, 2017 with the death of Charles “Mickey” LeMaistre at age 92.·

“Extraordinary” is the only word that adequately describes Mickey’s long career dedicated to improving the health of this nation. In 1962, at the age of 38, he was the youngest member appointed to serve on Surgeon General Luther Terry’s Advisory Committee on Smoking and Health that issued its landmark report linking cigarette smoking to lung cancer, heart and lung issues. Mickey was the last surviving member of the Advisory Committee.

Mickey served as a Chancellor of the University of Texas System for seven years (1971-1978) where he directed a significant expansion of the UT System, including new medical schools in Houston and San Antonio, and new Universities in Dallas, Odessa and San Antonio before becoming President of MD Anderson Cancer Center. During 18 years as the second full-time President of MD Anderson, Mickey led the institution through the period of substantial growth in programs, personnel, facilities, private philanthropy and reputation.

“The Executive Summary Report provides the three essential interventions that must be enhanced and given the highest priority if we are to accelerate the dramatic reduction in cigarette smoking in adults achieved over the last five decades. This landmark Report represents a consensus of the opinions of those who led the highly successful past efforts toward a society free from cigarettes”.   

Mickey LeMaistre – November 6, 2016    

 

 

Smoking control was an important and ongoing part of his life-long cancer prevention message. He chaired the National Conference on Smoking OR Health in 1981, the International Summit of Smoking Control Leaders in 1985, and he served as President of the American Cancer Society in 1987; he also chaired the Society’s National Committee on Tobacco and Cancer for two years.

In recognition of his life-time commitment to cancer prevention and control, the ACS presented Dr. Charles LeMaistre with its highest tribute, the Medal of Honor.

 

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